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Paula Scher

Paula Scher
Paula Scher is a renowned American designer and painter. Scher's repertoire of artistic endeavors is expansive, and notably encompasses the realms of design, painting, writing, education, and business. “My work is play,” she has said. “And I play when I design. I even looked it up in the dictionary, to make sure that I actually do that, and the definition of ‘play,’ number one, was ‘engaging in a childlike activity or endeavor,’ and number two was ‘gambling.’ And I realize I do both when I’m designing.” She is perhaps best known for her work in branding and logo design created while leading Pentagram, a New York City-based design and consultancy firm. Scher has created and redesigned logos for countless iconic brands, including Citi Bank, Microsoft Windows, CNN, the Metropolitan Opera, and The Museum of Modern Art in New York. Her paintings, which consist of large-scale maps filled with intricate lettering that indicate political and societal connections between countries and borders, have widespread achieved commercial success. Born in Washington, D.C. on October 6, 1948, she went to study at the Tyler School of Art and graduated with a BFA in 1970

 


The Museum of Modern Art (MoMA) has one of the most recognizable logotypes in the museum world. In 1964, the Franklin Gothic No.2 logotype was originally designed by Ivan Chermayeff. By 2004, Matthew Carter had redrawn a new custom typeface named MoMA Gothic. Although MoMA's core identity is a well developed iconic museum, applications like the web, print, and physical environment have not been unified or visionary like the museum itself. In order to continually carry the spirit of the institution, the museum hired Pentagram to design a more powerful and integrated comprehensive system.

To create a new approach that modernizes the institution's image, Paula Scher designed a complete methodology for the new system to work at any scale, from an exterior banner to a print advertisement in the newspaper. She designed a strong grid to uniform placement of images and types. The artwork is cropped to maximize visual impact,and each quadrant of a page or a banner has a specific function. A particular image is selected as the signature focus for an exhibit and list of upcoming events unrelated to the featured into a text block. The black on white logotype placed in a vertical position whenever is possible and always bleeds off an edge.
Julia Hoffman, MoMA's creative Director for Graphic and Advertising, and her internal team have used the new system and brought the system to life in applications from larger banners and subway posters to the website.

Finger Trap Handbags by James Piatt

Product news: these handbags by American designer James Piatt are carried by clamping fingers in woven tubes similar to Chinese finger trap puzzles.

The weight of the leather bags creates the pull needed to tighten the weave and secure fingers in the tubes.

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Finger traps are often used as practical jokes, involving the wearer struggling to remove their digits from either end of the tube, which is usually woven from bamboo.


Both ends of the trap have to be pushed inward to relax the mesh and release the fingers. "The finger trap is often used as a metaphor for a problem that can be overcome by relaxing," says Piatt.
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Piatt's small purse comes with one fastening, whereas the larger bag has three finger traps but can also be carried over the shoulder using a removable strap.

Laser-cut tabs interlock along the seams instead of stitching to create joints that look similar to the tubes.
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Other handbags on Dezeen include a set made from old binocular cases and some made from folded recycled paper.
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Hussein Chalayan

"I am not a fashion person, nor is it an artist, I am a creative person." - Fashion designer: Hussein Chalayan
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Hussein Chalayan
I am sorry that I have not found the contents of jacket Eugene
I can only study the designer - Hussein Chalayan

Hussein Chalalyan—Known as the British fashion industry genius.
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Chalayan's work is often expressed as a concept, he will design the concept pushed to the height of sculpture, furniture or architecture. When more and more designers indulge in luxury and trapped, he has always maintained his own design style. No wonder TIME magazine fashion editor Lauren Goldstein said he was "he opened up other people do not involve the field, relative to fashion, he chose pragmatic, relative to luxury, he chose to design." He immersed in his own world, through their own design clothing declared his own design talent.
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Hussein Chalayan best at the clothes to do "chaos", the level of chaos, color chaos, the structure is also chaos.

Hussein Chalayan has done a lot of experiments in his career, such as burying clothes in the garden to see how they are rotten, or to design sleeveless and sleeveless bandages. But he will be wonderful taste with the commercial smell soberly, the creation of the clothing was amazing and easy to be welcomed by the market. Facts have proved that in the fashion industry is not just sex is the selling point, the idea is.
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In the design of Hussein Chalayan, you absolutely do not see mediocre tricks, nor show off the so-called "poor" art, everything is creative and rigorous art. Hussein Chalayan's fashion show has always been a fantastic show of FASHION PEOPLE around the world, although in the past sometimes it will play the head, but because he transcends, the novel concept, always gives people a kind of infinite creative energy, led us overlooking future.
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Fishli & Weiss

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Occupied times

The Occupied Times of London is a political newspaper which originated from Occupy LSX in 2011.Originally produced from the occupations at St. Paul’s and Finsbury Square, the paper included news, features and interviews. It remains a free, non-profit publication without any advertising and was first published on Wednesday 26 October 2011.

The design of the Occupied Times of London incorporates Jonathan Barnbrook's 'Bastard' font, with a signature back-page placard design or slogan in each issue.

The last issue was Issue 29 March 2017 before it became Base Magazine  

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William kentridge

William Kentridge (born 28 April 1955) is a South African artist best known for his prints, drawings, and animated films. These are constructed by filming a drawing, making erasures and changes, and filming it again. He continues this process meticulously, giving each change to the drawing a quarter of a second to two seconds' screen time. A single drawing will be altered and filmed this way until the end of a scene. These palimpsest-like drawings are later displayed along with the films as finished pieces of art——Wikipedia 


A major new site-specific work by internationally acclaimed South African artist William Kentridge, entitled Triumphs and Laments: A Project for Rome will be inaugurated this week in Rome. A rich array of events will accompany the inauguration, scheduled to take place on the 21st and 22nd of April 2016.

The artist’s most ambitious project to date, Triumphs and Laments is a 500 meter-long frieze, erased from the biological patina on the travertine embankment walls that line Rome’s urban waterfront. Exploring dominant tensions in the history of the Eternal City from past to present, more than eighty figures, up to 10 meters high, represent Rome’s greatest victories and defeats from mythological time to present, forming a silhouetted procession on Piazza Tevere.
“The hope is that, [as] people walk the extent of these 500 meters, they will see images of the history they find both familiar and transformed in some way. And this will reflect the complex way in which a city is represented… We are trying to find the triumph in the lament and the lament in the triumph, putting together a sense of history from fragments.” – William Kentridge

Maiko Takeda

Maiko Takeda is a milliner and jewellery designer. Originally from Tokyo, Japan, she recently completed her MA in millinery at the Royal College of Art in London. With her expertise and prior knowledge of jewellery design gained from her BA Jewellery Design (Hons) at Central Saint Martins College of Art and Design, her interest lies in creating ethereal adornments to the body. Environmental influences such as shadow, wind and gravity create an experience of wonder and bewilderment for the adorned. The form of her work itself can never be its sole feature as the extra element is always seeking to transcend the expectations of the wearer as part of the work.
Her work experience includes Stephen Jones, Philip Treacy, and Erickson Beamon.
Maiko is currently working for Issey Miyake on the line of accessories.
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Roman signer

Signer's work has grown out of, and has affinities with both land art and performance art, but they are not typically representative of either category. It is often being described as following the tradition of the Swiss engineer-artist, such as Jean Tinguely and Peter Fischli & David Weiss.
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Signer’s "action sculptures" involve setting up, carrying out, and recording "experiments" or events that bear aesthetic results. Day-to-day objects such as umbrellas, tables, boots, containers, hats and bicycles are part of Signer’s working vocabulary. Following carefully planned and strictly executed and documented procedures, the artist enacts and records such acts as explosions, collisions, and the projection of objects through space. Signer advocates ‘controlled destruction, not destruction for its own sake’. Action Kurhaus Weissbad (1992) saw chairs catapulted out of a hotel’s windows; Table (1994) launched a table into the sea on four buckets; Kayak (2000) featured the artist being towed down a road in a canoe. In documenta 8 (1987), he catapulted thousands of sheets of paper into the air to create an ephemeral wall in the room for a brief, but all the more intense moment. As the Swiss representative at the Venice Biennale in 1999, he made 117 steel balls fall from the ceiling on to lumps of clay lying on the ground. Many of his happenings are not for public viewing, and are only documented in photos and film. Video works like Stiefel mit Rakete (Boot with Rocket) are integral to Signer’s performances, capturing the original setup of materials that self-destruct in the process of creating an emotionally and visually compelling event
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Hussein Chalayan's design is too far ahead, and he is concerned with the future generations that are almost in the imagination, which is hard to understand for the present society. He belongs to the next or even next time the designer. Hussein Chalayan Unlike John Galliano, Stella McCartney, and Alexander McQueen, his design is not rooted in history, street, or mythology, but reflects a future image and future Thinking, he used his fashion design to convey the possibility of a human civilization evolution is the human feet can leave the land, freedom in the universe through the era of Imagination and tell. This is the era of science fiction in the era, is the Hessein Karajan (Hussein Chalayan) creativity can really ride the stage
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Signer gives a humorous twist to the concept of cause and effect and to the traditional scientific method of experimentation and discovery, taking on the self-evidence of scientific logic as an artistic challenge. As well as working in his studio, which he calls his lab, Signer often takes off to the Swiss mountains to conduct larger experiments. A recent example of his installation work was "Accident as sculpture" (Unfall als Skulptur)(2008) in which Signer had a three-wheeled delivery car, loaded with water barrels, roll down an 11 m high ramp and up the other side. At the apex, the vehicle overturned and crashed to the ground. The resulting chaotic arrangement constituted the exhibition at de:Kunstraum Dornbirn. Another example, the video 56 Small Helicopters (56 Kleine Helikopter) (2008) shows a squadron of 56 remote-controlled toy helicopters as they rise into the air, collide with each other, carom off the ceiling and walls, and finally die in mechanical spasms on the floor.
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In 2011, Signer showed Restenfilme or film leftovers, always presented in a darkened room furnished with several rows of wooden chairs, one of which rocks unassisted on its back legs. The projection gathers actions, which Signer never constituted as full artworks, as well as shots of locations that were possible staging grounds for potential works
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Yayoi Kusama

 

Yayoi Kusama is a Japanese contemporary artist who works primarily in sculpture and installation, but is also active in painting, performance, film, fashion, poetry, fiction and other arts. During the 1960s she was a part of the New York avant-garde scene, especially in the pop-art movement. Since participating in the Japanese pavilion at the Venice Biennale in 1993 she has been exhibiting actively and has gained widespread international recognition. In 2017 a fifty-year retrospective of her work opened at the Hirshhorn Museum in Washington DC. Also that year the Yayoi Kusama Museum was inaugurated in Tokyo. ——Yahoo 

New York City, where she produced a series of paintings influenced by abstract expressionism. Switching to sculpture and installation as her primary media, Kusama became a fixture of the New York avant-garde during the early 1960s when she became associated with the pop art movement. Embracing the rise of the hippie counterculture of the late 1960s, she came to public attention when she organized a series of happenings in which naked participants were painted with brightly colored polka dots. Although temporarily forgotten after departing the New York art scene in the early 1970s, Kusama is now acknowledged as one of the most important living artists to come out of Japan, and an important voice of the avant-garde.

Kusama's work is based in conceptual art and shows some attributes of feminism, minimalism, surrealism, Art Brut, pop art, and abstract expressionism, and is infused with autobiographical, psychological, and sexual content. Kusama is also a published novelist and poet, and has created work in film, and fashion design. Major retrospectives of her work have been held at the Museum of Modern Art (in 1998), the Whitney Museum and the Tate Modern (in 2012), and the Hirshhorn Museum.In 2006, she received a Lifetime Achievement Award from the Women's Caucus for Art.Two years later, Christie's New York sold a work by her for $5.1 million, at the time the record price paid for a work by a living female artist.In 2015, the website Artsy named Kusama one of its top 10 living artists of the year.

Yohji Yamamoto A|W 2001\2002

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Btend and Hkiller Becher

ARTIST
Bernd Becher and Hilla Becher 1931–2007, 1934–2015
PART OF
Group of 6 Typologies
MEDIUM
9 photographs, gelatin silver print on paper
DIMENSIONS
Displayed: 1720 x 1420 x 21 mm
COLLECTION
Tate
ACQUISITION
Purchased with funds provided by Tate International Council, the Photography Acquisitions Committee, Tate Members and Tate Patrons 2015
REFERENCE
P81237
NOT ON DISPLAY
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A collaborative film from 1996 with director Peter Liechti titled "Signer's Koffer" (English: "Signer's Suitcase") documents a series of his "action sculptures" along with interviews of Roman Signer and other characters encountered during his travels performing the work.
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Summary
Gas Tanks 1965−2009 comprises nine gelatin silver print photographs taken by Bernd and Hilla Becher over a period of more than thirty years and printed in 2013 under the supervision of Hilla Becher. The prints are arranged in three rows of three. Although they exist in an edition of five, the grouping and sequencing of the images in this particular work is unique, determined by Hilla Becher. Typical of the Bechers’ work, the photographs show different examples of a specific type of industrial architecture, in this case gas tanks. The photographs were taken across a number of years and in different locations across Europe and the United States.
In addition to gas tanks, the Bechers created a number of similar ‘typologies’ of industrial architecture, including Blast Furnaces 1969–95 (Tate P81236), Water Towers 1972–2009 (Tate P81238) and Winding Towers (Britain) 1966–97 (Tate P81239). Each of these typologies gathers work from across a number of decades, reflecting the consistency with which the Bechers worked from the start of their collaboration in 1959. Since Bernd Becher’s death in 2007, Hilla Becher has continued the project independently. Together they photographed in excess of two hundred industrial plants and buildings in mainland Europe (predominantly Germany, France, Belgium and Luxembourg) and – from the mid-1960s – the United Kingdom and North America. Each time, they created a thorough photographic record of the architecture and site to cumulatively result in what they once described as ‘a more or less perfect chain of different forms and shapes’ (quoted in Stimson 2004). In 1966 a British Council grant enabled the couple to undertake their first significant project in Britain, where they visited all the major industrial areas and spent three months photographing in South Wales. Images from this trip are represented in Winding Towers (Britain).
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The particular strength of photography lies in an absolutely realistic recording of the world. This sets it apart from all other image media; photography can do this better than anything else. And the more precisely it depicts objects the stronger its magical effect on the observer.
(Quoted in Lange 2007, p.189.)
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To achieve the ‘perfect chain’ described by the Bechers, each photograph was produced following exactly the same setup, using a large-format camera positioned to capture the form from one of three distinct perspectives (as a detail, in the context of its surroundings, or in its entirety) so as to take up the whole frame of the picture. The flat, neutral quality of the prints was achieved by working in shadowless lighting conditions. Working within these parameters allowed the artists to make consistent groups of ‘types’ irrespective of when the images were taken. An initial classification was made according to the function of the architectural structure being photographed. This was then subdivided according to the materials used in the structure. Finally, the structures were grouped according to shared characteristics. Bernd Becher described in an interview in 1959 how ‘you can lay the photos alongside one another and realise what they have in common, what is specific to the basic form of a blast furnace or a cooling tower and what is individual variation’ (quoted in Lange 2007, p.188).
Bernd and Hilla Becher met at the Kunstakademie Düsseldorf in 1957 where they were studying typography and graphic and printing techniques respectively. From the outset of their collaboration two years later, they drew on the formal traditions of early industrial architectural photography by practitioners such as Charles Marville (1813–1879) and Richard Gessner (1894–1989) to undertake a systematic recording of the industrial architecture of the western world. In 1970 they termed their subjects ‘anonymous sculptures’; structures that silently dominate the landscape in which they stand, their form and function implicitly bound up with the geography and economy specific to that region. Although their work is often discussed in terms of creating a record of a disappearing landscape, they have stated that ‘right from the outset we have likewise photographed very newly built plants … And it is simply not true that we are only interested in “antiquities”’ (quoted in Lange 2007, p.188).
In the 1950s and early 1960s the Bechers’ unmediated, dispassionate approach and taxonomical mode of presentation stood in stark contrast to the pictorialist aesthetic dominant in photography at the time, instead drawing on the attitudes of the interwar avant-garde movement Neue Sachlichkeit (New Objectivity) and its photographic practitioners such as August Sander, Albert Renger-Patzsch and Karl Blossfeldt. In the later 1960s and into the 1970s, however, certain readings of the Bechers’ work found a synthesis between elements of their practice and the concerns of the contemporary artistic avant-garde that existed beyond the realms of photography, such as minimalism’s emphasis on functionalism and purity of form, and the application of seriality and repetition that was central to much conceptual art.
However, whereas conceptualism equated photographic production with ‘de-skilling’, Bernd and Hilla Becher’s meticulous approach to their subject matter made technique of primary importance. In 1989 they described their attitude as follows:
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In aligning the photographic with broader practices in contemporary art without surrendering craftsmanship, the Bechers’ position had a transformative effect on attitudes to photography within the context of fine art as a whole. This is something that continues to be felt not only in the impact of their own work but also in that of the students Bernd Becher taught at the Kunstakademie Düsseldorf, including photographers such as Andreas Gursky, Candida Höfer, Thomas Ruff and Thomas Struth.
Further reading
Bernd and Hilla Becher, Fördertürme, Munich 1997.
Blake Stimson, ‘The Photographic Comportment of Bernd and Hilla Becher’, Tate Papers, no.1, April 2004, http://www.tate.org.uk/research/publications/tate-papers/01/photographic-comportment-of-bernd-and-hilla-becher, accessed 28 April 2016.
Susanne Lange, Bernd and Hilla Becher: Life and Work, trans. by Jeremy Gaines, Cambridge, Massachusetts 2007.
Emma Lewis
March 2014
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